This blog is devoted to my John Welsford designed 15' Navigator yawl Ellie. I built her in my garage over a period of 18 months and launched her in 2011. She sports a sliding gunter main, roller furled jib and sprit-boomed mizzen. Her construction is glued-lapstrake over permanent bulkheads and stringers. This blog is a record of her construction and her voyages here in the Puget Sound area and (hopefully) a useful resource for fellow Navigator builders.

Sunday, July 6, 2014

Boarding Straps

I finally got around to adding Boarding Straps to Ellie.  This was long overdue, and I fully admit that sailing around without them for the past 3 years was a serious act of negligence on my part.

Especially considering how easy they were to make, and how well they appear to work.

I made my boarding straps from 1" nylon webbing.  The same stuff that cargo tie-down straps use.  I have a big bag full of tie-down straps, way more than I ever need, so I recycled two of them.

After doing some research, I found that 20" below the waterline is where they work best.  I formed the webbing into a big loop, ran the ends through two holes that I have in bulkheads 5 and 6, and tied the ends together.  That's all there was to it.


I like the bright yellow color of the webbing.  I think it will be easy to see under water and in an emergency.  I will simply bunch the webbing under the side deck.  In the event of a capsize, the webbing will spill out onto the seat tops and should be easy to find.

I added one on each side of the boat.  I tested them in my driveway and was very pleased with how they worked.  It was much easier to get on board the boat than I thought, after only one attempt.  Here's a video.  Try not to laugh.  This is serious business.


I will do an on-the-water test, but I already feel relieved.

6 comments:

  1. Nice solution for the Navigator.
    The in-the-water test will tell the tale.

    My comments below are based on numerous successful SCAMP re-entries (both practice and for-real) using a boarding stirrup with adjustable strap.

    You will probably find it need to be a bit longer as normally, when you try to step up your foot etc goes under the hull and you lose your leverage.

    The solution, after you have your foot securely on the strap, is to float your body out more horizontally (one hand on the strap and the other hand on the hull to leverage yourself out) and kick your bent leg more back toward your butt to straighten it and leverage your torso across the coaming. It's best to roll in keeping your center of gravity low. Don't be surprised to make several attempts to get the length right for you and perfect your technique. Note well that you significantly less able on each subsequent attempt.

    Cheers,
    Simeon

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    Replies
    1. Thanks for the valuable insight Simeon. You guys have put a tremendous amount of research and testing into SCAMP's safety. I really appreciate the suggestions.

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  2. Ha! Like your arrangement. I think I will shift mine along slightly. Thanks for sharing Joel. Just out of interest, how long did you make Ellie's oars?
    Steve

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  3. Hi Steve,
    What you're seeing in the photo is a 6 foot canoe paddle. I use it primarily to punt/paddle far enough off the beach to drop the outboard without risking the prop. There has been many a time where I've wished I had a pair of oars though. The paddle stores very nicely under the side decks. Can't even tell its there. I've thought about buying a second paddle and using them as short, wimpy, makeshift oars. They may be long enough to row short distances in crowded places.

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  4. Thanks for these great little tips mate! me and my brother have just acquired a half finished navigator and will be taking all these on board. hoping to have it yawl rigged partly for aesthetics and partly because a second mast would help with your tent setup as a great boomstay.

    Will also be looking at getting an outboard, I was thinking a 5hp as boats in Australia 5hp or under don't need to be registered. we may just use it as a fishing boat occasionally. do you think the little 2.5hp outboards could cope with that?

    ReplyDelete
  5. Thanks for these great little tips mate! me and my brother have just acquired a half finished navigator and will be taking all these on board. hoping to have it yawl rigged partly for aesthetics and partly because a second mast would help with your tent setup as a great boomstay.

    Will also be looking at getting an outboard, I was thinking a 5hp as boats in Australia 5hp or under don't need to be registered. we may just use it as a fishing boat occasionally. do you think the little 2.5hp outboards could cope with that?

    ReplyDelete